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Joy of Recording: Does watching and recording wildlife make a difference?

…arrow, is under severe threat in London. I’m sure you will appreciate this recording adds up to a great deal of time spent in what we would describe as a joyful activity, but does all this effort make a difference or are we wasting our time? Does recording the robin that visits a garden most days, really help in any way at all? In more ways than one it seems it does help. It’s possible that as well as participants making a direct contribution to r…

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Joy of Recording

…ripples into the very heart of local and national governance. For me, the joy of recording is multifaceted. It is seeing the first brimstone butterfly of spring; hearing the joyous song of the skylark; or seeing swaying swathes of smiling ox-eye daisy. However, perhaps too, we should all take heart, knowing that the records we make and send onto our wildlife recorders and to GiGL, really can make a difference – helping to influence the shape of L…

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Joy of Recording

…such as GiGL is important to me. I work with GiGL directly through my own recording, and indirectly via the LNHS. I have been a member of the LNHS for many years and have recently become the secretary of the ecology and entomology section. Most of my recording is done at weekends, but I also keep my eyes peeled while out and about during the week. For example, recently, while running errands I spotted a small moth on lavender in a flower bed. It…

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It takes a team to create a report

…e with recorders and verifiers and their diversity is clearly shown in the Joy of Recording GiGLer articles. These are written by recorders with links to GiGL and have a clear love for the natural environment and wildlife recording. Recorders and verifiers are an integral part of the GiGL world and a vital cog for anyone wishing to discover more about London’s wildlife.” Show moreShow less As London’s Local Environmental Records Centre GiGL is inv…

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Recording Analysed 

…species from an area, and where are they purely indicative of a change in recording effort? Just like most human interests, fashions in recording have changed over time. At different times, some species have been surveyed for more or less than others. Species datasets can also reveal the interests of local resident recorders. When individuals move house or stop recording that can be seen within our datasets too. The first step in investigating th…

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A Sense of Place: The history of the geographical information in the London Natural History Society records

…into 112 more or less equal areas. Much of this evolution of geographical recording boundaries can be well traced through the biological recording history of the London Natural History Society (LNHS). The twenty-four recording divisions within a 20-mile radius from St. Paul’s Cathedral © Google Maps 2019 The first defined recording area for LNHS was established in 1904, by the North London Natural History Society. Their area of operations was def…

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Joy of Recording: fourteen years of data

…ter London Council’s London Wildlife habitat survey. Although I was mostly recording vascular plant species, as a birder it was not uncommon for me to add any birds I found or heard while I had the trusty The Wildflower Key by Francis Rose in hand hoping to find something delightfully different from the norm. Finding over 250 species of plants (not including the deliberately planted or sown ones) on the small Lorn Road Allotment site in Lambeth wa…

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Joy of Recording

…over and learn about the snails, the more fascinating they become. With my recording efforts accumulating, I came across GiGL in 2014, as recommended by my neighbour who worked at Kew Gardens, and submitted my records through the online form along with images of the live specimens. My records apparently make up a fifth of all Thames two-lipped snail records on GiGL’s species database which highlights the need for increased recording effort around…

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Joy of Recording: How the skylarks on Warren Farm taught me how to sing

…it is, I reach out and ask someone who does. Something has to change. As enjoyable and amazing and mind-blowing an experience recording nature on Warren Farm has been, it is in equal measure – heart-breaking. There are species here on Warren Farm, across the UK and the world that we humans are knowingly allowing to be pushed into vulnerable and extinction Red Lists. Looking back now over the ecology report undertaken on Warren Farm, the one that s…

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Recording analysed

…terns displayed on the below maps vary, the distributions probably reflect recording effort as much as actual species distributions. We hope the maps will be useful in showing the recording gaps which exist for different species, and inspire recorders to survey in those gap locations and submit their sightings to GiGL. Remember you can submit your species sightings online here, or get in touch. GiGL records: Stag beetle GiGL records: Japanese knot…

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