Posts Tagged ‘Surveys’

Structuring Surveillance

We at GiGL are always striving to increase the number of records we hold by encouraging more people to get involved in recording, and by supporting existing recorders in carrying out surveys and encouraging them to share records with us. Previous GiGLer articles have looked at some of ways in which we work with recorders, recording societies and the general public to this end.

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Field Studies Council

An environmental education charity which began in 1943, the Field Studies Council works with people of all ages and abilities, providing opportunities for them to experience the environment at first hand; to discover, explore, be inspired by, and understand the natural environment. Everything that we do has close links to the work of GiGL and all local records centres.

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Citizen Science

Citizen science is not new. The Guide to Citizen Science (2012), a joint publication between the Biological Records Centre (part of the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) and the Natural History Museum, highlights a long tradition of people contributing their free time and expertise to the discovery and understanding of British wildlife.

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Churchyards of London

Brian Cuthbertson, Head of Environment and Sustainability at the Diocese of London The Churchyards Ecology Survey is the first phase in a multi-year project called ‘Churchyards for London’. Depending on how you count them, there are about 600 churchyards in Greater London, yet we know surprisingly little about them, especially about the wildlife and ecosystems they…

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An Eye on Eels

All is not well with the European eel (Anguilla anguilla). Research over the last thirty years indicates that the number of eels arriving each year (recruitment) in some rivers in Europe, from the Sargasso Sea, is believed to have declined by up to 95%. In 2008, in recognition of this worrying decline, the International Union for Conservation of Nature listed the European eel as critically endangered.

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Counting Sparrows

House sparrows are no longer ubiquitous. Both rural and urban populations in the UK have shown a severe decline. In London numbers fell by a shocking 68% between 1994 and 2000. The drop in numbers has been so dramatic that sparrows are now “red-listed” as a species of high conservation concern.

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Australian Invasion

Invasive non-native species are thought to be the biggest threat to biodiversity globally, second only to habitat destruction. They can result in significant declines in native fauna and flora, devastate threatened species and replace rich local biodiversity with a sea of a single species. They are reported to cost the British economy alone around £1.7 billion annually.

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Rivers of Data

We always knew that iGiGL, our new online mapping interface, had great potential. Its value in allowing users to access our data without the need for desktop mapping software has already been recognised by Natural England and the Environment Agency. For no sooner had we launched iGiGL than they approached us about the possibility of extending its functionality.

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Hopping in Peckham

Last year I undertook a photographic invertebrate study of a seemingly insignificant park in London. I was interested in what I would find in a small urban park. I chose Warwick Gardens in Peckham as it was close to my home, making it easy to pop there for a couple of hours each day. My mission was to photograph everything that moved.

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