• About GiGL

    We work with service level agreement holders, customers and the public to meet a range of data needs. Our ongoing development has been shaped by our users since 1996.

  • Our Data Holdings

    Data is the core of everything we do. It is our life blood and our reason for being. Find out more about the data we hold, what you can do with it and how you can contribute to it.

  • Submit Records

    We encourage everyone to submit records knowing that not only will they be securely managed, but also that they will help inform decisions in London.

  • Access our Data

    Our data is available to all - whether you want to know what wildlife is in your back yard, need comprehensive data for a single site or you need to know everything about everything.

  • Planning

    Many of the datasets GiGL manage inform the planning process. Protected and notable species observations and designated sites information provide baseline data to consult as part of local decision making. These and other datasets can also feed into strategic planning at the landscape level.

  • Surveying & Recording

    GiGL's work would not be possible without the many recorders in London. These pages explain what happens to your records at GiGL and include some practical recording guidance.

Latest News

Riband wave, Warwick Gardens, Peckham Moth Night (c) Penny Frith

3 million milestone

At GiGL we are celebrating entering record number three million into the species database! The record in question was one riband wave moth (Idaea aversata) from a large London Natural History Society dataset of moth records digitised by GiGL and verified by County Moth Recorder, Colin Plant.  This dataset was one of several recently added to […]

Image of the Week

Combined Autumn Photos, 2014 ( (c) Helen Saunders, Sarah Bailey, Gary Sollof, Penny Frith)

Our Autumn Watch

This week’s image is a collection of photographs sent in this autumn by London’s recorders via GiGL’s one-off sighting form. The leopard slug record was sent in by Helen Saunders, seen in September in a garden.  The common frog was found by Sarah Bailey in composting leaf mulch in October.  This kestrel was snapped by Gary Sollof […]